WordPress Benefits Developers and Clients | Thursday, November 12th, 2009

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Many people use WordPress for a lot of different things. Whether it be a portfolio, a political blog, a fully featured shopping cart, or a photo gallery. When WordPress first came out, it was viewed as just a blogging platform. Now it is being referred to for what it really is: a content management system. Not just any content management system either. It has become one of the most robust and popular that is available.

The truly great thing about WordPress is that it benefits both the developers and the client. Below I’ve listed five reason why WordPress is great for both.

1 – Open Source

For the developer this means that they don’t have to worry about any type of licensing issues that may occur with any other piece of software that is worth any value. For the client this mean that the software is completely free. WordPress has so many features right out of the box that really help to cut down development cost.

2 – Editable

Thanks to posts, pages, widgets, and custom fields developers can make every single element of text editable. This benefits the client greatly. I don’t know how many times I’ve been contacted by past clients, asking me to update a sentence or two. I have even had new clients that all ready have a site built, and are just contacting me to swap some copy out for them.

3 – Support

The WordPerss community is huge. Not only for developers, but also for users. There are vast amounts of blogs, forums, and tutorials out there which teach the in’s and out’s of WordPress, whether it be teaching how to directly query the WordPress database, or schedule a new post to publish at a certain date and time. If you have a question about WordPress you search Google, and most likely find your answer.

4 – Flexability

WordPress has the power to be absolutely anything you want it to be. Sometimes you have to be a bit creative, but surely enough, there is a solution. WordPress isn’t limited by it’s own capabilities. You can pull in multiple API’s to create a whole new experience. Fav.eti.me is a great example. It pulls photos from Flickr, based on direct messages a special Twitter account has received, and users can vote on which photos they like the most. Completely user-driven.

5 – Extendability

Plugins are probably the thing that people like most about WordPress. If there isn’t a certain functionality built into WordPress, someone has most likely all ready made a plugin for it. There are 7,208 different WordPress plugins that have all ready been developed. Some of these may allow you to make quick and simple contact forms. Others may change the way all posts are formatted. There are truly a multitude of different plugins, so if WordPress can’t get the job done, surely a plugin can.

Conclusion

There you have it. Five reason why WordPress is a great choice for you and your client or you and your developer. If you’re a developer, ask you client if they’d like to save some money, and be able to edit the content of their site a year from now. If you’re a client, ask your developer if they know about WordPress and how it can really save a lot of development time and tons of headaches.


Post Author: Stephen Coley

Stephen Coley started making websites in the 7th grade, and just hasn't stopped. Currently, Stephen is the lead developer at BrandSwag, a social media marketing firm based in Indianapolis, Indiana. He thrives off of creative web development and can't get enough of new technologies.


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Author: Stephen Coley

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  • http://www.printingray.com/custom-stickers-printing.html custom stickers

    I read your conclusion, and just going to ask from my developer. I also like wordpress for my personal blogs as well business site but, now pretty irritate from the WordPress Cart, i read your first blog post in which you show about the other cart importance so, can I update on wordpress or not? Is this supported? I listened every CMS supported the different carts. Is this right ?

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